Staff Profiles

 

    Dr Katherine Tuft
General Manager
katherine.tuft@aridrecovery.org.au


Kath leads the team at Arid Recovery, managing operations, overseeing the science program and coordinating community engagement. Arid Recovery is a highly collaborative organisation and much of Kath’s work involves fostering partnerships and facilitating collaborations and relationships with partners, researchers, students and volunteers.

She has a background in conservation ecology, having completed a PhD on Brush-tailed Rock-wallabies in NSW, and spent six years working on declining mammals in northern Australia.

Kath met her husband Hugh McGregor at the Arid Recovery Reserve in 2006 and is pleased to return to the arid zone with their two sons in tow.

 
     
     

  John Crompton
Field & Maintenance Officer
john.crompton@aridrecovery.org.au

John has been beating around outback South Australia all his life, working on pastoral stations from the banks of Lake Eyre to the Gawler Ranges, doing everything from chasing sheep to building causeways and fixing pumps. He brings his lifetime of experience and can-do work ethic to Arid Recovery to maintain and develop the infrastructure at the Reserve, and to manage feral control programs.

John is ever vigilant to feral animal incursions into the Reserve. He can knock up practical solutions from whatever is lying around and is a critical part of the team.


     
     

  Kimberley Solly
Science and Education Officer
kimberley.solly@aridrecovery.org.au

Kim links Arid Recovery’s science program with our community engagement activities. Completing a Bachelor of Science with Honours on plant-invertebrate interactions in arid South Australia, Kim brings her experience to collecting long-term monitoring data and assists on research projects. Kim coordinates Arid Recovery’s large network of volunteers, organises tours and runs workshops for school groups.  She also manages communications, preparing the newsletter and managing the website and social media platforms.

Kim has a penchant for creative crafts, always developing new ideas for how to share the beauty and wonder of the arid zone.


     
     

  Dr Katherine Moseby
Research Scientist
katherine.moseby@adelaide.edu.au

Katherine founded Arid Recovery in 1997 with her husband John Read. She has been instrumental in the reintroduction work and research undertaken at the Reserve and is one of Australia’s experts in arid zone ecology and threatened species reintroductions. Katherine completed her PhD at the University of Adelaide and has published more than 50 peer reviewed scientific articles. She also manages the Ecological Horizons consultancy (www.ecologicalhorizons.com) and was recently awarded a DECRA through the University of NSW where she is investigating the importance of individual hunting behaviour in feral cats.

Katherine continues her involvement as Arid Recovery's research scientist as an investigator on the University of NSW Prey Naivety Project. She brings her depth of knowledge to coordinating research, supervising students and assisting in the Reserve's long-term monitoring programs. 


   
     

  Letitia Sikora
Office Manager
letitia.sikora@aridrecovery.org.au


Letitia manages the day-to-day running of the Arid Recovery office, handling accounts, supplies and maintaining procedures. She is very active in fundraising and developing sponsorship opportunities with local businesses.

Letitia is excellent at organising the workplace, and brings her unrelenting energy to Arid Recovery. These days, she manages her job between the office and at home where she’s now raising a young family. Letitia is a great advocate for all things fluffy.

     
     

  Marty Kittel
Fence Maintenance Officer

Marty is our longest-serving staff member, having been part of Arid Recovery for over 15 years. Between working on site at Olympic Dam, Marty does a regular complete and thorough check of the external perimeter of the Reserve to ensure that the fence’s integrity is maintained. When he started checking the fence in 1997 he patrolled 15km around the Main Expansion. Now he patrols 58km of fence from the Main right up to the Dingo Pen and down again.

Marty’s institutional knowledge of the fence is invaluable to Arid Recovery. He has a knack for spotting corroding footnetting and takes his role very seriously. Marty also helps out with feral animal control and erosion works.

     
     
  Dr Aaron Fenner
Regional Ecologist
aaron.fenner@aridrecovery.org.au


Aaron is a herpetologist with a background in animal behaviour and a passion for snakes. He completed his PhD on pygmy bluetongue lizards, a highly endangered species restricted to only a small part of South Australia. He has published 38 scientific articles and is an adjunct lecturer at Flinders University where he supervises honours and PhD students.

Aaron’s regional ecologist role is a joint position between Arid Recovery and partner Bush Heritage Australia through the South Australian Rangelands Alliance. He divides his time between the Arid Recovery Reserve and Bush Heritage’s Bon Bon Station Reserve. At Arid Recovery, Aaron coordinates the monitoring program and works with collaborating researchers on joint projects. He is a key part of the Ian Potter Foundation project to reintroduce threatened species to Bon Bon and is an investigator on the University of NSW Prey Naivety project. 

 
     
     

  Dr Hugh McGregor
Postdoctoral Researcher (UTas)
hugh.mcgregor@utas.edu.au


Hugh is completing a postdoc through the University of Tasmania (www.utas.edu.au/zoology) and the National Environmental Science Program Threatened Species Hub (www.nespthreatenedspecies.edu.au). The bulk of his research is conducted at Arid Recovery.

Having recently completed his PhD on feral cats in northern Australia, Hugh brings his skills to study the interaction between cats, rabbits and native prey animals. Hugh is enthusiastic about bringing new tools to help with monitoring and research at Arid Recovery and is working with animal-borne video and thermal imagery to gain a better understanding of feral cats.

Hugh worked at Arid Recovery as an intern and volunteer over 10 years ago where he became well known as a bilby-whisperer.


     
     

  Emily Gregg
Research Intern

Emily recently completed her Masters of Science (Zoology) at the University of Melbourne, where she investigated a management strategy aiming to halt cane toad movement in Western Australia. Her field work involved translocating and radio-tracking toads, and monitoring their survival in a potential barrier environment.


Emily will be assisting with annual trapping, research projects, tours and events.

     
     

 
Nathan Beerkens
Research Intern

Nathan has joined us from Perth, having recently completed his Honours degree in Conservation and Wildlife Biology at Murdoch University, where he studied the movement patterns and physiology of an estuarine fish; the black bream.


Nathan will be assisting with annual trapping, research projects, tours and events.
























John has been beating around outback South Australia all his life, working on pastoral stations from the banks of Lake Eyre to the Gawler Ranges, doing everything from chasing sheep to building causeways and fixing pumps. He brings his lifetime of experience and can-do work ethic to Arid Recovery to maintain and develop the infrastructure at the Reserve, and to manage feral control programs.

John is ever vigilant to feral animal incursions into the Reserve. He can knock up practical solutions from whatever is lying around and is a critical part of the team.

John has been beating around outback South Australia all his life, working on pastoral stations from the banks of Lake Eyre to the Gawler Ranges, doing everything from chasing sheep to building causeways and fixing pumps. He brings his lifetime of experience and can-do work ethic to Arid Recovery to maintain and develop the infrastructure at the Reserve, and to manage feral control programs.

John is ever vigilant to feral animal incursions into the Reserve. He can knock up practical solutions from whatever is lying around and is a critical part of the team.

Latest News

SEE MORE
Annual Trapping 2017
27 Mar, 2017
Intern Emily Gregg describes the 2017 annual trapping event in this photo blog. Only a few weeks ago the Arid Recove ..
Read More
Arid recovery is a conservation initiative supported by:
bhp
adelaide university