Staff Profiles

 

    Dr Katherine Tuft
General Manager
katherine.tuft@aridrecovery.org.au

Twitter: @KatherineTuft

Kath leads the team at Arid Recovery, managing operations, overseeing the science program and coordinating community engagement. Arid Recovery is a highly collaborative organisation and much of Kath’s work involves fostering partnerships and facilitating collaborations and relationships with partners, researchers, students and volunteers.

She has a background in conservation ecology, having completed a PhD on Brush-tailed Rock-wallabies in NSW, and spent six years working on declining mammals in northern Australia.

Kath met her husband Hugh McGregor at the Arid Recovery Reserve in 2006 and is pleased to return to the arid zone with their two sons in tow.

 
     
     

  John Crompton
Field & Maintenance Officer
john.crompton@aridrecovery.org.au

John has been beating around outback South Australia all his life, working on pastoral stations from the banks of Lake Eyre to the Gawler Ranges, doing everything from chasing sheep to building causeways and fixing pumps. He brings his lifetime of experience and can-do work ethic to Arid Recovery to maintain and develop the infrastructure at the Reserve, and to manage feral control programs.

John is ever vigilant to feral animal incursions into the Reserve. He can knock up practical solutions from whatever is lying around and is a critical part of the team.


     
     

  Georgie Neave
Ecologist

georgina.naeve@aridrecovery.org.au

Georgie implements Arid Recovery’s monitoring program and ensures continuity of our important long term datasets. 

Arriving at Arid Recovery in 2017 with a Bachelor of Environmental Science and Honours in regeneration of spinifex (Triodia spp) grasslands of Western Queensland, Georgie spent the previous six years working across various regional locations for the Victorian State Government. Most recently she spent three years implementing the Glenelg Ark Project, a landscape scale fox control and fauna conservation project in far southwest Victoria.

Georgie is excited to be living and working in the arid zone. She loves getting to know our reintroduced species (especially quolls!) and sharing her passion for flora with the team.



     
     

  Dr Katherine Moseby
Principal Scientist
katherine.moseby@adelaide.edu.au

Katherine founded Arid Recovery in 1997 with her husband John Read. She has been instrumental in the reintroduction work and research undertaken at the Reserve and is one of Australia’s experts in arid zone ecology and threatened species reintroductions. Katherine completed her PhD at the University of Adelaide and has published more than 50 peer reviewed scientific articles. She also manages the Ecological Horizons consultancy (www.ecologicalhorizons.com) and was recently awarded a DECRA through the University of NSW where she is investigating the importance of individual hunting behaviour in feral cats.

Katherine continues her involvement as Arid Recovery's Principal Scientist and as an investigator on the University of NSW Prey Naivety Project. She brings her depth of knowledge to coordinating research, supervising students and assisting in the Reserve's long-term monitoring programs. 


   
     

 
     
     

  Marty Kittel
Fence Maintenance Officer

Marty is our longest-serving staff member, having been part of Arid Recovery for over 16 years. Between working on site at Olympic Dam, Marty does a regular complete and thorough check of the external perimeter of the Reserve to ensure that the fence’s integrity is maintained. When he started checking the fence in 1997 he patrolled 15km around the Main Expansion. Now he patrols 58km of fence from the Main right up to the Dingo Pen and down again.

Marty’s institutional knowledge of the fence is invaluable to Arid Recovery. He has a knack for spotting corroding footnetting and takes his role very seriously. Marty also helps out with feral animal control and erosion works.

     
     
    Nathan Beerkens
Field Ecologist and Community Coordinator
nathan.beerkens@aridrecovery.org.au

Twitter: @NathanBeerkens

Nathan links Arid Recovery’s science program with our community engagement activities. He completed a Bachelor of Science with Honours in Western Australia, working with fish, and is now thrilled to have made a sea-change to the outback.

Nathan assists on research projects and maintaining and expanding our long-term ecological datasets. He also coordinates Arid Recovery’s large network of volunteers, organises tours and runs workshops for school groups. He manages communications, prepares the newsletter and manages the website and social media platforms.

Nathan is always looking for new ways of getting kids interested and excited about the natural world.

     
  Melissa Jensen
Reintroduction Techical Officer
melissa.jensen@aridrecovery.org.au

Twitter: @MelissaJensen_

Melissa is responsible for implementing our Western Quoll reintroduction program. This began with catching the quolls in Western Australia and the Flinders Ranges, SA, collaring and releasing them at Arid Recovery, tracking their movements, monitoring their diets and reproductive status and reporting. She works closely with all of the Arid Recovery staff, interns and volunteers.

Melissa has been involved with Arid Recovery on-and-off for several years, completing her Honours here in 2012 on the habitat use of western barred bandicoots. Since then, she has assisted with our animal monitoring program and is completing a PhD on the reintroduction of Western Quolls (Idnya) to the Ikara-Flinders Ranges.

     
    Milly Breward
Administration Officer
milly.breward@aridrecovery.org.au

Milly has joined Arid Recovery as the Administration Officer. She has a background in administration and Finance and previous experience working in Roxby Downs in 2008.

Originally from the UK, Milly and husband Jamie came to Australia in 2002. With a passion for the outdoors Milly has travelled around Australia enjoying many of the attractions including snorkelling on the Ningaloo Reef, witnessing the Stairway to the Moon in Broome and several trips along the ocean road.

Milly is looking forward to learning more about the animals within the reserve and the opportunity to share this knowledge with overseas visitors. She is also enjoying trying to keep the staff in-line.



 
    Dr Hugh McGregor
Feral Predator Researcher (Arid Recovery) and Postdoctoral Researcher (UTas)
hugh.mcgregor@utas.edu.au


Hugh is completing a postdoc through the University of Tasmania (www.utas.edu.au/zoology) and the National Environmental Science Program Threatened Species Hub (www.nespthreatenedspecies.edu.au). The bulk of his research is conducted at Arid Recovery.

Having recently completed his PhD on feral cats in northern Australia, Hugh brings his skills to study the interaction between cats, rabbits and native prey animals. Hugh is enthusiastic about bringing new tools to help with monitoring and research at Arid Recovery and is working with animal-borne video and thermal imagery to gain a better understanding of feral cats.

Hugh worked at Arid Recovery as an intern and volunteer over 10 years ago where he became well known as a bilby-whisperer. These days he volunteers for Arid Recovery on feral predator research.

     

 
     
     
























John has been beating around outback South Australia all his life, working on pastoral stations from the banks of Lake Eyre to the Gawler Ranges, doing everything from chasing sheep to building causeways and fixing pumps. He brings his lifetime of experience and can-do work ethic to Arid Recovery to maintain and develop the infrastructure at the Reserve, and to manage feral control programs.

John is ever vigilant to feral animal incursions into the Reserve. He can knock up practical solutions from whatever is lying around and is a critical part of the team.

John has been beating around outback South Australia all his life, working on pastoral stations from the banks of Lake Eyre to the Gawler Ranges, doing everything from chasing sheep to building causeways and fixing pumps. He brings his lifetime of experience and can-do work ethic to Arid Recovery to maintain and develop the infrastructure at the Reserve, and to manage feral control programs.

John is ever vigilant to feral animal incursions into the Reserve. He can knock up practical solutions from whatever is lying around and is a critical part of the team.

Dr Hugh McGregor
Feral Predator Researcher (Arid Recovery) and Postdoctoral Researcher (UTas)
hugh.mcgregor@utas.edu.au

Blog

SEE MORE
Year of the Quoll
12 Dec, 2018
Year of the Quoll – A reintroduction update By Nathan Beerkens 2018 was a big year. After two years of trials and research ( .. ..
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Arid recovery is a conservation initiative supported by:
bhp
adelaide university