One of the most unique Green Army Projects in Australia

Admin Aridrecovery - Wednesday, January 11, 2017
Few young people (aged 17-24) in Australia have the opportunity to get so close to the running and management of a world class conservation, research and education facility such as the Arid Recovery Reserve (our Project Partner). The wisdom and inclusiveness of Arid Recovery staff and their allies over the past 20-weeks has provided experiences our Participants will be able to use and reflect on in both their professional and personal lives. The Green Army is an Australian Government initiative which provides opportunities for Participants to work on local community and conservation projects, while gaining skills and training that can help them enter the workforce or improve their career pathways. 


An early morning of bilby trapping and processing with researcher Lisa Steindler. All photos credited to: Adrian Friedel

The work we have carried out at the Reserve falls into two broad categories: infrastructure maintenance, and science and research. Fence upkeep is integral to the Reserve’s success and ‘feral-free’ mantra. A large focus of this Project was replacing footnetting in areas where the integrity of the original skirt was starting to fail (through rusting and chemical breakdown). In some cases we used reclaimed netting from decommissioned pastoral fences within the reserve, to reduce pressure on a stretched budget. We also foot-netted the western fenceline of the 2nd Expansion, an area which was once used as a control, but now supports burrowing residents from the surrounding exclosures. 


All in a days work - Fencing is an integral part of Arid Recovery. 

The last few weeks of our Project included conducting vegetation monitoring using a quadrat-based method to quantify the impact of particularly bettongs on vegetation species inside the Reserve (using a selection of sites outside the Reserve for comparison). This replicates adds to a study first conducted in 2013. Given that current bettong populations are considered a little on the high side, we expect a marked contrast in plant condition. 

My team has also enjoyed participating in community activities such as regular market days, the Arid Recovery Quiz night and Christmas pageant. Together with contributions to the online presence of the Reserve (through blog and photo submissions), this has provided an insight into the importance integrated community involvement in maintaining the regional profile of the Reserve. The team also had the chance to visit Bon Bon Reserve to assist with wombat warren monitoring and maintenance tasks. 

Having the opportunity to get up close and personal to the unique wildlife of Arid Recovery lists as another highlight, and we are grateful for the generosity of visiting (and resident) researchers in incorporating the Green Army with some of their catching and processing activities.


The team regularly assisted at community events and fundraisers.

Written by Adrian Friedel, Round 2 Green Army Supervisor
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Arid recovery is a conservation initiative supported by:
bhp
adelaide university