How the Tricky Stickies got their name- How to catch a rat!

Kimberley Solly - Thursday, August 27, 2015

Greater stick-nest rats (Leporillus conditor) are best known for their ability to build themselves a home out of sticks; however their nests can be well hidden and hard to find.  For this reason the stickies have remained quite elusive to researchers at Arid Recovery since their re-introduction in 1999. 

Can you spot the ear tag on this Greater stick-nest rat? Credit: Casey Harris


Another factor that has hindered researchers getting to know our stickies are the boisterous burrowing bettongs (Bettogia lesueur). There are many more bettongs at Arid Recovery than stick-nest rats so if you set cage traps for stickies outside their nests you’ll most likely find them full of bettongs. One method that’s had more success is to fit a plywood board to the front of the cage trap with only a small hole for the rats to squeeze through. However, not to be stopped the burrowing bettongs have become exceptionally good at bouncing and knocking over the cage traps to try to get to the bait inside.

So when Bec West the Research Officer for the ARC linkage project needed to trap and fit radiocollars to at least 20 stick-nest rats she needed to think outside of the box. Bec found that the best way to catch a rat was by using a ‘ratstaurant’, a nifty excluder with an even better name! A ratstaurant looks a bit like a top hat made of 50mm chicken wire mesh and pegged into the ground with droppers. The rats can squeeze through the mesh and the bettongs can’t dig under. Place an Elliot trap with a nutritious and healthy treat of carrots inside the ratstaurant and bingo! You can catch stickies and not bettongs.


Ratstaurant monitored by remote camera. Credit: Bec West


“There’s nothing more rewarding than finding a Greater stick-nest rat in a trap, it means we’ve outwitted the bettongs” said Bec West.



A Tricky Stickie caught in the act feeding within a ratstaurant. Credit: Bec West


Twenty-one stickies have now been fitted with a unique ear tag number and a radio collar, which continues to provide more and more information on these secretive stickies. Before this study commenced 30 known nests were monitored biannually to check for activity, the list has now grown to 63 nests. Radiotracking stickies has allowed Bec and her team to discover new nests across the 60 km2 area that the Greater stick-nest rats inhabit. Previous observations on stickies found that they sheltered in penguin burrows on islands and rabbit burrows on mainland Australia (Moseby & Bice, 2004; Troughton, 1924). The stickies at Arid Recovery have been tracked to new nests, but also to new bettong warrens.  While the burrows may not show signs of stickie activity aboveground, they may be crucial for sheltering stickies over relatively cold winters. The male rats that are collared have also been roaming far and wide (up to 1.5km between shelter sites) so they have had the team out on ‘stickie-hunts’ trying to track them down. You can see why they have got the name ‘Tricky Stickies’ from the research team – hard to find, hard to trap and hard to track!

Now that the rats are collared the ARC team will set traps at each nest twice a year to better understand the survival, movement and nest dynamics of the stickies. The team are also testing their predator savviness by seeing how closely then can approach stickies at night, and how they behave when they are exposed to different predator (dingo, cat, mulga snake, quoll) scents while feeding. We wonder whether they will continue to be so ‘tricky’.

Written by Kimberley Solly, Scientific and Education Officer and Bec West, Research Officer for ARC Tackling Prey Naiveté Project

References:

Moseby K.E. and Bice J. (2004). A trial reintroduction of the Greater Stick-nest Rat (Leporillus conditor) in arid South Australia. Ecological Management and Restoration 5(2) 118-124.

Troughton ELG (1924) The Stick-nest building rats of Australia, Australian Museum Magazine, 11, 18-23. 

Getting hands-on at Science Alive!

Admin Aridrecovery - Wednesday, August 26, 2015

With national science week wrapping up for another year, what better time to look back on the fun that was Science Alive! 

  

Bigger and better than ever, 2015 marked the event’s tenth anniversary, with a bustling crowd of 26,000 science enthusiasts over a massive three days. Hosting over 50 science-related organisations, you can’t help but be entranced by some of Australia’s hottest science and technology. Keen to get in on the action, Arid Recovery was surely never going to miss the chance to enviro-talk their way through the masses.

Watched over by Wodger the wedge-tailed eagle and bobby the burrowing bettong, the cosy stall was our most interactive yet. With few Australians (and even fewer children!) getting the chance to experience our vast arid interior, we brought the red sands and their stories down with us. Do you think you could guess what animals we share our lives with at Arid Recovery from just one touch? That is exactly what thousands of intrigued minds had the chance to try as they got hands-on with our fury friends. Hidden inside six boxes where the furs of an echidna, rabbit, greater stick-nest rat, cat, kangaroo, and dingo. With a few hints, many brave young scientists guessed correctly and learnt about some of the animals we help protect.  

Not to be outdone by some of the other innovative stalls at the expo, our digital 3D landscape gave everyone the chance to explore the home of our reintroduced burrowing bettongs. By clicking on the screen, visitors could try to find the warrens (burrows) of the native rabbit-sized kangaroo. This computer reconstruction of the arid landscape is part of new research into the ecology of Arid Recovery, but also helps us engage the public with their environment. So if you just can’t get enough of science, make sure to take your family to Science Alive 2016, or even better visit us for a tour


Written by Matt Bowie, Arid Recovery volunteer & University of Adelaide Honours student

Arid recovery is a conservation initiative supported by:
bhp
adelaide university